Updates @ Radiation Alert

Dealing With Low-Level Radioactive Waste

Introduction Low level radioactive waste (LLRW) management is an important element of all radioactive material use programs. If that program generates wastes that must be removed from your site for disposal, LLRW management will consume significant financial resources as well. As the RSO. you want to use your resources as efficiently as possible. Using the information presented here should make efficiency a reality. Waste Minimization Plan The most subtle element of any low-level radioactive waste management program is a waste minimization plan. In its simplest form, the plan needs to convey the notion that your institution’s policy is to reduce, where and when possible, the volume of radioactive waste produced. This statement is perhaps obvious, but it needs to be on paper. The details of a conversation you have with a radioactive material user who promises to greatly reduce the magnitude of a waste stream is easily forgotten. A document, Continue...

Radioactive Isotopes in Industry

Americum-241 Used in many ionizing type smoke detectors Used to measure levels of toxic lead in dried paint samples Used to ensure uniform thickness in rolling processes, such as steel and paper production Used to help determine where oil wells should be drilled Used as portable Gamma Ray source Cadmium-109 Used to analyze metal alloys Used in nicad (nickle and cadmium) for battery production Used in pigments, coatings and plating, manufacture of plastic products, and alloys Calcium-47 Important aid to biomedical researchers studying the cellular functions of bone formation in mammals, bone metabolism problems or to diagnose calcium disorders Californium-252 Used to inspect airline luggage for hidden explosives Used to gauge moisture content of soil in the road construction and building industries Used to measure the moisture of materials stored in soils Used as a neutron source to identify gold and silver ores through a technique known as neutron activation Continue...

Radiation Leak Testing – Am I Required to Test My Sealed Sources?

Typically, license holders who operate a sealed source are required to have the source tested for leakage periodically. Records of leak test results are kept  for a period of three years after the date of the testing. Reports are often in units of microcuries (µCi) for review and approval by inspectors working in the applicable industries. In the absence of verifiable test results, the sealed source may not be used until testing is done and approval is given by the appropriate authority. The exception is for energy compensation sources, which are required to be tested every 3 years. Approval is given by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or an Agreement State and radiation leak test intervals are not to exceed 6 months. Individuals can conduct radiation leak tests that must be approved by the Commission or an Agreement State. The instrumentation used must be capable of detecting down to 185 Continue...

Radiation Dosimeter Comparison

Do I need an electronic dosimeter? Analog dosimeter? What is the best type of radiation dosimeter for my application? It is important to choose the correct nuclear radiation dosimeter if you’re on the job around potential exposure. The following chart will help you decide on the best one for your application. Customers can contact us if further consultation is needed. We’re always happy to assist. The Pen Dosimeter is a nuclear radiation dosimeter with a gas filled chamber. A small meter filament inside the unit tracks your dose. No batteries are needed. Simply look through the pen to see your dose, much like a telescope. The Sentry EC is an energy compensated GM based dosimeter and rate meter. It had internal memory, USB, and is the most rugged of our line up. The solid aluminum enclosure comes with the belt clip attached. The RAD-60 is a pager style dosimeter with Continue...

Radiation Alert® and the RadResponder Network

The RadResponder Network is the national standard and Whole Community solution for the management of radiological data. It is a product of collaboration between Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Department of Energy (DOE) / National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and is provided free of charge to all Federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial response organizations. RadResponder’s flexible architecture enables organizations to rapidly and securely record, share and aggregate large quantities of data while managing their equipment, personnel, interagency partnerships, and multijurisdictional event space. RadResponder can be accessed on smartphones, tablets, and via the web, allowing it to be seamlessly and rapidly employed at all levels of government during a response to a radiological or nuclear emergency. RadResponder has a growing community and innovative technology designed to accelerate radiological emergency response to today’s speed of information. With the addition of Bluetooth BLE and the included Continue...

A Brief Literature Summary on the Occupational Hazard of Chronic Low Dose Radiation Exposure and Suggested Requirements for Further Study

Glossary bias – Any systematic error in an epidemiologic study that results in an Incorrect estimate of the association between exposure end risk of disease. cause-and-effect relationship – Positive criteria in judging causality which include: strength of association, biologic credibility, consistency of findings, as well as, temporal sequence and dose response relationships. chance – A happenstance; an occurrence that happens by being lucky or unlucky. cohort – A subgroup sharing a common factor in a statistical survey. confounding factors – Conditions that are lumped together with other conditions Indiscriminately. epidemiology – All the elements contributing to the occurrence or non-occurrence of a disease in a population. etiological agents – The agent(s) of c~use or origin for a specific disease. excess cancers – A statistically significant higher number of cancer cases in comparison to the number of expected cancer cases in the general population. linear energy transfer (LEI). low and high Continue...

About Radiation Alert® by S.E. International, Inc.

COMPANY HISTORY Since 1979 RADIATION ALERT® instruments have proven ideal for a wide range of applications. As the manufacturer of our products, we have engineered them to be reliable, simple to use and understand, and affordably priced. We’re dedicated to our customers and promise to help you find the appropriate instrument for your needs. Our continuing development reflects our commitment to meet the ever-increasing and changing needs of first response, industrial, governmental, educational, medical, and environmental markets. All Radiation Alert® products are shipped promptly and supported by comprehensive customer and technical service. All our instruments, both warranty and non-warranty, can be repaired and calibrated by our in-house technicians. COMPANY MEMBERSHIPS & AWARDS U.S. Commerce Deputy Director Carlos Poza Honors Local Woman-Owned Business With Export Achievement Award Carlos Poza, Deputy Director General of the U.S. Commerce Department’s Commercial Service today presented S.E. International, Inc., of Summertown, Tennessee, with the Department’s Export Continue...

Observer USB Software Video Operation Manual

This is a quick start guide to get you going with the use of the Radiation Alert® Observer USB Software. The software was designed to work with your digital radiation detector. The following Survey Meter and Geiger Counter models are compatible: The New Observer USB is a free version of the Observer software that runs on Windows®. It can be used with The Ranger, The Ranger EXP, The Monitor 200, & The Monitor 1000EC Radiation Detectors. The Observer USB reads in Counts, CPM, and CPS, as well as µR/hr, mR/hr, and µSv/hr and has the ability to collect, log, and perform statistical analysis on the data received. Continue...